New Reclaimed Water Transmission Line Helps The Springs

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida Water Management Districts have funded 26 springs projects with more than $40 million, that will result in $82 million for spring improvement projects after local matching funds.

Hernando County will invest $6 million in a reclaimed water transmission line along US19 that will provide up to 1.7 million gallons of reclaimed water per day to the Timber Pines Subdivision and Golf Course for irrigation use. Both Hernando County and SFWMD will each contribute an extra $3 million, for a grand total of $12 million.

The Weeki Wachee Springs springshed should benefit from this project through reduced nutrients and reduced potable water use. It will enable long-term sustained growth in the area by reducing environmental pressure on the Weeki Wachee River and Springs.

The project should be completed by spring of 2017.

Prescribed Fires for Hernando County

The Land Management Section of the Southwest Florida Water Management District will be conducting prescribed burns during the months of October through March at two preserves in Hernando County.

weeki wachee preserveApproximately 400 acres at Weeki Wachee Preserve will be burned in small, manageable units. The property is located west of US Highway 19 between Spring Hill and Hernando Beach. Some trails may be temporarily closed during prescribed burn events.

Approximately 300 acres at Annuteliga Hammock will be burned in small, manageable units. The property is comprised of several blocks and is located east of US Highway 19 and north of Centralia Road and south of the county line.

According to Will VanGelder, the District’s land management supervisor, burns are implemented to mimic natural fire cycles under a controlled situation. The objective is to avert uncontrolled wildfires and enhance the area’s natural conditions by maintaining the ecological and wildlife habitat values. Prescribed burns are only conducted when weather conditions are optimal to meet the desired objectives and to minimize impacts to the public.

Although every effort will be made to assure that smoke does not affect homes or highways, vehicle operators should exercise caution if smoke reduces visibility on the area’s roads or highways.

Prescribed Fires for Pasco County

The Land Management Section of the Southwest Florida Water Management District will be conducting prescribed burns during the months of October through March on the Weeki Wachee Preserve in Pasco County.

The property is located north of Hudson west of US Highway 19 and includes the Aripeka Sandhills (Aripeka Road) tract. Approximately 50 acres will be burned in small, manageable units.

According to Will VanGelder, the District’s land management supervisor, burns are implemented to mimic natural fire cycles under a controlled situation. The objective is to avert uncontrolled wildfires and enhance the area’s natural conditions by maintaining the ecological and wildlife habitat values. Prescribed burns are only conducted when weather conditions are optimal to meet the desired objectives and to minimize impacts to the public.

Although every effort will be made to assure that smoke does not affect homes or highways, vehicle operators should exercise caution if smoke reduces visibility on the area’s roads or highways.

Greenways And Trails Projects

The Florida Greenways and Trails Council will start two days of meetings and consider numerous projects for designation as parts of the Florida Greenways and Trails System.

The Florida Greenways and Trails Council (FGTC) was established pursuant to 260.0142, Florida Statutes. Among its duties, the Council serves to advise the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on greenway and trail related issues, promote intergovernmental cooperation and private partnerships for developing the greenways and trails system, recommend priorities for critical links in the system, and provide funding recommendations for developing and managing the system.

The council typically meets four times a year at various locations throughout the state.

The next meetings will be held at:
weeki wachee preserve

  • Weeki Wachee Springs State Park
    6131 Commercial Way
    Weeki Wachee

    Tuesday, July 7, 2014 – 1 PM
    Wednesday, July 8, 2015 – 8 AM

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Bay Scallop Season June 27-September 24

For three months of the year Bay Scallop Season allows local residents and visitors to harvest these delicacies on the West coast of Florida from Aripeka, Hernando County northwards. In 2015, open harvest season for bay scallops along Florida’s Gulf coast runs from June 27 – September 24.

scallop zone mapIts popularity may be the cause of its decline as a natural resource. The 2015 Annual abundance survey from the Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission finds the local scallop population ‘vulnerable’ with less than 1 scallop per 12 square yards.

Reasons for the decline can be attributed to environmental events such as hurricanes, major tropical storms and El Niño or a decline in water quality, polution or overfishing.

The daily bag limit is 2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person (max. 10 gal. of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gal. bay scallop meat per vessel).

For more information: Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission

TreeUmph! adventure course coming to Hernando County

The Board of County Commissioners recently approved an incentive package for CSC Holding Group, LLC, d/b/a TreeUmph! Adventure Course of Bradenton, Florida to expand to Brooksville. The attraction plans to open by November 2016.

TreeUmph! plans to lease with an option to purchase approximately 47 acres owned by Hernando County which is located in east Hernando County on Cedar Lane. The attraction will feature different skill levels of zip lines, bridges, bungee swings with hanging nets in conjunction with a base camp that includes ticket sales, visitor’s center, concession, gift area and a picnic area(s) for ages seven and up.

Continue reading TreeUmph! adventure course coming to Hernando County

America’s Fastest Growing City: Weeki Wachee, Florida

With a predicted growth of 2750%, Weeki Wachee will be one of the fastest growing cities in the nation. The tiny town that currently holds 3 residents, grew out of the roadside attraction, started by Newt Perry in 1947. It shows up on maps after it incorporated in 1966, offering free advertising for the attraction.

The City of Mermaids is located on 640 acres and is mainly known for the attraction and its first-magnitude spring, that were only recently made part of the new Weeki Wachee Springs State Park. The park includes water rides, animal shows, mermaid costume shows and manatee watching.

Under continuous pressure from the state, the little city has decided to build an 86-unit apartment complex and expand its population base and thus avoid being decertified by the state for having too few residents. This will cause an enormous population growth that, in time, may help to pay down the city’s debt and again, make it more attractive to be swallowed up by the county.

Enjoy the hidden gems Weeki Wachee has to offer.